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공개·회원 41명
Joshua Moore
Joshua Moore

Who Wants To Buy A House ^NEW^


Those housing trends are continuing, causing 2023 to be something of a transitional year. Sellers still have an edge in many areas, thanks to continued scarcity of houses, and no one expects a dramatic crash in home prices or values. Still, the frenzied pace has definitely subsided, and many analysts see a shift towards a more balanced market, benefitting buyers.




who wants to buy a house



A final walk-through is an opportunity to view the property before it becomes yours. This is your last chance to view the home, ask questions and address any outstanding issues before the house becomes your responsibility.


There are multiple parties involved when getting a mortgage and buying a house. Your real estate agent is your representative in the home purchase transaction. Your agent will look out for your best interests by finding homes that meet your criteria, get you showings, help you write offers and negotiate.


A real estate agent represents you and helps you understand how to buy a house. Your agent will show you properties, write an offer letter on your behalf and assist in negotiations. Real estate agents are local market experts and can also advise you on how much to offer for each property.


Only you can decide which property is right for you. Make sure you see plenty of homes before you decide which one you want to make an offer on. Like much of the home buying process, you can do a great deal of your house hunting online.


Lauren Barber's home in Columbus, Ohio, on Nov. 16. Barber sometimes gets called or texted more than five times a day with offers from investors and companies that want to buy her house. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption


Jennifer Folden-Nissen's three-bedroom, Victorian-style house in Duluth, Ga., isn't for sale. But that hasn't stopped a guy calling himself Henry from phoning her at least once a week. She says the pitch is always the same: "I want to buy your house. I'm willing to pay cash. Today."


Jennifer Folden-Nissen bought this house in 2017 in Duluth, Georgia. Over the summer, a particularly aggressive speculator kept calling and apparently lurking about, taking photos of the house and putting homemade postcards in the mailbox. Jennifer Folden-Nissen hide caption


Lauren Barber stands in her home in Columbus, Ohio, on Nov. 16. Barber has been inundated with offers from investors and companies that want to buy her house. She sometimes gets called or texted more than five times a day with offers. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption


"If you know anything about Columbus, it's growing and it's hot," she says. "People want to live here." Barber bought her house about 10 years ago for $155,000. She says now it's worth more than twice that.


"Like, really, you're going to call my mom and ask her if I'm going to sell my house to you? It was just the most absurd and amazing thing," she says. "But I told you no. Stop calling me. Don't bother my mom."


"These guys get into their house, and they use these high-pressure and deceptive sales tactics to sort of hammer and hammer and hammer the homeowner until the homeowner signs the documents." He says he has seen elderly or lower-income residents sign away their homes for half of what they're actually worth.


Froehlich says homeowners should be very careful if they respond to any direct solicitation. He says people are almost always better off selling their house the traditional way, where you list it for sale, get a bunch of offers and then pick the best one.


You should examine your income, savings (for a down payment and closing costs), and recurring debt to figure out how much house you can afford to buy. The 43% debt-to-income (DTI) ratio standard is a good guideline for being approved and being able to afford a mortgage loan."}},"@type": "Question","name": "How Does Buying a House Work?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Buying a house is often among the most significant purchases in your lifetime. When you find a house you want to buy, you should first figure out if you can afford it, then ask your lender for a pre-approval letter, which means the lender believes you are likely qualified for a mortgage loan, and then, you can make an offer. If the seller accepts your offer, you will need to take several next steps, including paying a downpayment and having your mortgage loan approved by an underwriter and lender.","@type": "Question","name": "What Is the 28/36 Rule?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "The term 28/36 rule is a guideline used by underwriters and lenders use to see if you can afford the home you want to buy. In general, this rule is considered one of the best ways to calculate the amount of mortgage payment debt, you can afford based on your income.Many lenders require that potential homebuyers' maximum household expense-to-income ratio is 28%, with a maximum total debt-to-income ratio of 36% in order to be approved for a mortgage."]}]}] Investing Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All Simulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard Economy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All News Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All Reviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All Academy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All TradeSearchSearchPlease fill out this field.SearchSearchPlease fill out this field.InvestingInvesting Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All SimulatorSimulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard EconomyEconomy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal FinancePersonal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All NewsNews Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All ReviewsReviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All AcademyAcademy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All Financial Terms Newsletter About Us Follow Us Facebook Instagram LinkedIn TikTok Twitter YouTube Table of ContentsExpandTable of ContentsUnderstand Your DTI FirstWhat Mortgage Lenders WantCan You Afford the Down Payment?The Housing MarketThe Economic OutlookConsider Your Lifestyle NeedsSelling One Home, Buying AnotherDo You Plan to Stay?Homebuying FAQsThe Bottom LineMortgageBuying a HomeAre You Ready to Buy a House?You'll need to consider more than just finances


You should examine your income, savings (for a down payment and closing costs), and recurring debt to figure out how much house you can afford to buy. The 43% debt-to-income (DTI) ratio standard is a good guideline for being approved and being able to afford a mortgage loan.


Buying a house is often among the most significant purchases in your lifetime. When you find a house you want to buy, you should first figure out if you can afford it, then ask your lender for a pre-approval letter, which means the lender believes you are likely qualified for a mortgage loan, and then, you can make an offer. If the seller accepts your offer, you will need to take several next steps, including paying a downpayment and having your mortgage loan approved by an underwriter and lender.


Understand that making an offer on a home is sometimes the start of a psychological game. You likely want to get the home for as little as you can without losing the house outright. The seller wants to maximize the selling price of the home without scaring you away. Where should you start with your first offer? Conventional wisdom says to begin at 5 percent below the asking price, but market conditions will largely determine how much wiggle room you have. The more competitive the market, the more likely you are to face multiple bidders. In a soft market, where listings have been sitting unsold, you will have more negotiating power. In a rising market, prime listings will command the full asking price or more, and sometimes offering just a few thousand dollars above listing price can help your offer stand out. Either way, keep your budget in mind when you make your first offer and set a cap of how high you are truly willing to go.


Once your bid on a house is accepted, you set in motion the process that will take you to finally holding a set of keys in your hand. While you may be eager to move into your new place, it is in your best interest to do your due diligence to make sure you get a home that it is in good condition and at a good rate. 041b061a72


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